Archive | April, 2013

Delphinium nuttallii

30 Apr

20130430-104850.jpg

We have several species of native Delphinium in the northwest, but this little guy is rapidly becoming my favorite. I also have D. trollifolium, one of the parents of the modern hybrids that gets tall, and likes its feet wet. I grow that one in a kiddy pool that stays wet year round. But this is the “Upland Larkspur” that inhabits open drier spots on both sides of the mountains, from west side prairies to east side sage brush flats and openings in the ponderosa woodlands. I’ve seen them grow as tall as two feet in open prairies (well, assuming it wasn’t the very similar D. menziesii), but in a pot with as much drainage as I can manage, it seems to prefer staying more compact and around 12-18 inches in full flower. This stockier aspect is nice, looks great, but this spring I decided to put it up on a plant stand both for extra drainage, and so the flowers were higher for the hummers.

Although I have yet to see the hummers use my potted one, I have seen one being visited in the mountains. I believe the tiny little hummer I saw visiting one on a path in the Hurricane Ridge area was a calliope, but I couldn’t see enough of it to be certain. It visited every single open flower on two plants nearly side by side, before chipping at me and flying off. Hopefully my garden potted plant is as attractive to them, when I’m not looking.

So far this plant has been willing to self seed. Since a full scape can produce and amazing amount of seed and I still want my mother plant to develop more, I tend to cut all but one or two seed pods off. I’ll probably continue to do this for quite a few years. There really is no reason to produce tons of seeds, as I don’t really have a lot of places to put them. This is one of the plants I want to develop a dry bed for, the question is where since sun is at such a premium here, and dry sun like this even more so. Pots are relatively easy with this species, so it’s an easy one to leave in its pot.

If you have a sunny dry area, especially a bit of a bank or slope, consider this in a drought tolerant border. It would look spectacular with other low prairie species like Roemer’s fescue, graceful cinquefoil, and fleabanes, sedums and other low growing drought tolerant plants.

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Fuchsia magelanica ‘molinae’

30 Apr

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This is quite possibly the hardiest of my fuchsias, and is reliably one of the first to bloom here. In a mild winter, it will even remain partly evergreen, in which case it will start blooming in late spring, often in April but usually by May even in a cd year. It also has one of the most upright, almost tree forms of any of the magelanica types I grow. At one point my old one was pushing fifteen feet tall, before a killer winter took it all the way down to the found again. I lost a bunch of hardy fuchsias that year, the only two to survive for me were this one, and my grandmother’s heirloom type.

Luckily for me, the hummingbirds also seem to like this cultivar, which from what I gather is a selection from the wild of the straight species. I don’t know if the white color (actually palest pink and lavender, which mostly shows in cooler spring and fall weather, but is apparent on close inspection) is normal and common where it is from, or if this represents a kind of floral albinism, but it is lovely and distinctive.

Like most fuchsias, it seems easy enough to propagate from cuttings most of the year when in active growth. Hard or soft wood seems to make little difference, just make sure the cuttings don’t dry out too much, and are protected from direct sun or wind. Once established, they are pretty drought tolerant, though. Summer water does keep them flowering better, and develop into a larger shrub, which may or may not be a good thing. This has been a long time favorite in my garden, both of the gardener and for hummingbirds.

UW Arboretum Florabundance Plant Sale gleanings

28 Apr

So this weekend was the annual plant sale at the Washington Park Arboretum, the Florabundance Plant Sale. Traditionally, this is the biggest and most diverse of the spring sales, though its a might cramped at the Arboretum compared to what they have had in the past at Magnussen Park. Still, it’s a must go to event for many gardeners, and an important sale for many of the vendors too.

This year I conned my sister Beth into taking me, and we kind of egged each other into way more plants than I really had intended on getting. Beth laughed at me when I pulled a list out of plants I was looking for. We only found three things from the list, but we did find three FLATS of cool stuff to bring home;

Abutilon hybrid (looks much like an A. megapotamicum type)
Agastache ‘Golden Jubilee’
Anemones nemerosa ‘Vestal’ (Beth saw this one in bloom in a display bed by the donation area behind the Pat Calvert Greenhouse, and then we found one for sale! Yay!)
Chaenorrhinum origanifolium ‘Blue Dreams’ (dwarf snapdragon)
Cuphea ignea
Embothrium coccineum (Beth had to twist my arm HARD on this one. I’ve been lusting after this plant for years, and now that we took out the Laburnum, we have the perfect place for it. I just really hope that it survives… These can be difficult to get established, and are only half hardy around here. Once growing though, they should be good, and there is a reason they are called Chilean Fire Bush. Hummers are supposedly as besotted as people when they are in full flower.)
Fuchsia ‘Billy Green’ (from the Pat Calvert Greenhouse again, my good friend Lynn Shoe had her stock plant there to show off the nice flowers… Beth and I got suckered in by them, lol)
Fuchsia campos portion (this one I even know exactly where to put it!)
Fuchsia glazioviana (we both fell in love with the foliage… I just hope it proves hardy)
Fuchsia ‘Juellia’ (bright gold foliage, with reddish tinge to the newest growth… Should be stunning in a pot, I just hope the hummers like the flowers, and it proves hardy…)
Fuchsia magelanica ‘Purple Mountain’
Impatiens omeiana (such pretty leaves!)
Iris cristata (Beth fell in love with the sweet little flowers, lol, especially when the vendor claimed it would grow under Rhodies)
Lobelia tupa
Mentha spicata (“Morrocan Mint”, cause it smells divine, for our watermelon compote this summer, lol)
Mimulus cardinalis
Pelargonium ‘Tango Velvet Red’ (Beth loved the dark, velvety red flowers)
Ribes sanguineum ‘White Icicle’ (because I don’t have enough Ribes already, right? I do know where I want to put it though…)
Salvia ‘Wendy’s Wish’
Salvia darcyi ‘Pscarl’ (Vermillion Mexican Sage)
Viola ‘Angel Amber Kiss’
Viola ‘Rebecca’

Beth says I shouldn’t take her to plant sales any more, that we just get each other in trouble, lol… But we did get some really cool plants! I think the hummers will be happy here this summer *grin*.

Camassia leichtlinii

28 Apr

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The Great Camas, Camassia leichtlinii, is one of the best of our native bulbs, and luckily one of the easiest to grow. So long as you have a good sunny spot for it, it will often thrive and produce more and more flowers each year.

The blue to purple flowers make quite a statement. As one of the signal species of the northwest prairies on both sides of the mountains, and one of the staples in the local tribes diet, it’s not too surprising this is one of the more common wildflowers on the Puget Sound prairies. Luckily it adapts to gardens well, growing generally bigger and more robust in the garden than in its natural habitat. I’ve seen garden specimens pushing four feet in full flower, with twenty or so florets on a single stem, extending the bloom time slightly as it slowly opens from bottom to top.

These flowers are a good source of nectar, particularly for bumblebees, but also for the occasional hummingbird and when they bloom late enough, for the first few tiger swallowtail butterflies when they come out. The bulbs are what native tribes harvested these onion relatives for. I haven’t tried to eat them myself, but the starch in them needs to be cooked under long slow heat to break down the starches into something edible for people, otherwise they are liable to cause dissenters and flatulence.

There is an amusing story that says the early explorers Lewis and Clark, when they overwintered at Fort Clatsop at the mouth of the Columbia River, traded for these bulbs to get through the winter. Apparently the bulbs have most of the party terrible gas, making the stay on the Columbia for the winter rather miserable for much of the party. Now the coastal tribes were used to trading with Europeans by this time, since Russian Fur traders came up and down the coast, and in California Spain had already set up colonies. Hudson’s Bay fur traders were also already in the area. It’s entirely possible the local tribes were either playing a huge joke on the small group, or someone pissed off the wrong person during negotiations, and they responded by trading them half cooked camas bulbs.

Whatever the case, they were amazed to see in spring the fields of camas in bloom, like “clear blue lakes”. It’s hard to imagine now, since most of those camas prairies have been bulldozed in the name of progress, turned into shopping malls, housing complexes, or plowed for agriculture. Nowadays a few remnants here and there are what remain to tell of once great fields of these.

Like many of the prairie plants, camas doesn’t like sod grasses, like the weedy ones that mostly make up the modern lawn. The native prairie grasses like Roemer’s Fescue are clumping grasses, which leave space between the plants for seedlings of things like camas to develop. Sod grasses. Rears a dense carpet, which smothers the seedlings, and in a dry year can create a cap which absorbed most of the water before the camas bulbs are able to get any. Slowly over texture older bulbs die out in sod, and aren’t replaced by new seedlings.

For the gardener, propagation is pretty simple. Camas bulbs divide much like tulips or daffodils. This method is slow, but if you have a nice true blue, or darker purple colored one, this method gives you identic plants to spread around. Seed is also pretty simple, and in fact they will self seed when able to. Seedlings the first year look like a single blade of chives, and are easy to weed out in the garden. But if left, in three to five years will start to flower themselves. I usually leave only a single seed pod on older plants since I want more flowers, and seed production can get out of hand quickly, lol. In good soils, these will get bigger and better each year if not asked to set tons of seed.

Bloom time is usually April into May, usually around Mothers Day. They grow really well in pots, especially when they are younger. Transplanting is easy any time of year, though when in flower I usually take off the flowers once transplanted. Apparently to harvest, natives used a digging stick and would simply flip the dirt clods over. Bulbs of the camas would be stuck to the bottom of the root balls of the grasses, easy to pick out. I’ve used a similar method to dig these in spring to transplant bulbs, carefully teasing the sprout out of the grasses.

Here in the Puget Sound, we have two closely related species- C. leichtlinii and C. Quamash, common camas. For the gardener, the main difference is that great camas puts more energy into putting more flowers on the stem, and will get taller and have longer flowering stems but clumps slower, while common camas puts more energy into dividing and stays shorter with more stems with fewer flowers. Common camas does better in pots, great camas better in perennial borders where it is less likely to get overwhelmed by aggressive neighbors. Given good sun and decent soil, both are great in the garden.

The bulbs are surprisingly moisture tolerant in winter, but prefer to dry out in summer. They will handle some summer water though, just need good drainage if grown in summer irrigated areas.

They may never be as popular as tulips and daffodils, or even crocus, but these late spring bulbs are an excellent addition to any sunny garden.

Ribes sanguineum

28 Apr

20130428-080301.jpg

Ribes sanguineum, the red flowering currant, is (and I know I say this a lot, lol, but it’s really true!) one of my favorite natives. In this case, it’s not just because of the spectacular show of the bright white to pink to reddish pink flowers, it’s also because when this is in bloom, it is the queen of hummingbird plants. It blooms in early spring, sometimes even late winter, generally in March and April, about the same time as another hummingbird favorite, the salmonberry (Rubus spectabilis). Where salmonberry likes its feet wet, especially in winter, RFC likes it dry. It will take sun or shade, though is happiest somewhere between, and aside from not liking to be too wet is not picky about soils. I’ve seen beautiful ones growing in cracks in bedrock on steep cliffs, and others in the understory of closed canopy conifers. It’s a tough plant, and will take a fair amount of abuse and come back smiling. While I don’t recommend it, it’s one of the few shrubs you can literally plant and walk away, and as long as its not too dry, have a fair chance of getting it to survive. Regular watering the first few years will help immensely though.

As I said, it doesn’t like wet feet. If this plant has one major drawback, its that it seems to have weak roots. It is susceptible to root rot in various forms. Given too wet a spot, it may do well for a few year, but with any damage to the roots will quickly get root rot and more often than not, suddenly collapse. This also means that if its in the wrong spot, it rarely transplants well once established. You are actually better off taking cuttings and propagating the plant to where you want to move it to, than trying to transplant a bigger one. It is also one of the alternate hosts of a rust that also attacks white pines. This rust is rarely fat to the currant, but can quickly become so on the pine. If you have white pines, watch for yellow to orange rusty spots and speck long on the back of the leaves of the currant, and puss like weeping sap from canker like boils on the trunks of the pine. The cankers can kill the pine, but the currant generally simply sheds its leaves in fall, and is ok in spring, though the plant is often stressed enough if other factors affect the plant the combination can be lethal. Raking these leaves in fall is a must if you see them, dispose of them in a plastic bag, don’t burn them or put them in yard waste as the spores of the rust can then infect other plants. Other than that, these are generally easy care shrubs with few problems or diseases most of the time.

Pruning couldn’t be simpler. It responds well to pruning, even making it into a box like shrub hedge if needed. Just remember winter pruning will reduce flowers that year, though it will generally bounce back quickly from even a heavy pruning.

As you might expect, there are a fair number of cultivars of this amazingly ornamental shrub, both from local selections of wild or garden plants, and quite a few developed in Europe. When I first started planting natives, about the only one available in nurseries (and still one of the most common varieties) was “King Edward VII”. A friend and I joke that this is a species that had to “go to Europe to get an education” before people would accept it. Now there are dozens of cultivars, and as a testament to how much I love this plant, I have quite a few here myself.

Along with the straight native, I have ‘Strybing Pink’, ‘Pokey’s Pink’, ‘Appleblossom’, ‘Pulsborough Scarlet’, and ‘variegata’. I used to also have ‘Elk River Red’ which was very similar to Pulsborough Scarlet’, but is a more local selection, I think from Oregon.

I do these days try and stay away from California selections of the more southerly variety Ribes sanguineum glutinosum, simply because I would rather keep the species roots more intact. May be a silly thing, but I think it’s important.

I recently picked up another one, ‘White Icicle’, which I will try in the back. I like this cultivar, not just because the nearly pure white flowers are different than most I have, but because it tends to bloom a week or two earlier than the darker cultivars. This is one I believe was developed in BC, and is a tried and true cultivar, with a nice open slightly wider habit than some of the others.

The picture above is from the one seedling I have had self seed in the garden. Luckily it grew in a spot I can leave it, though its getting big enough I may have to start trimming it back. I refer to it myself as “Ace of Mercer”, but I don’t know if its special enough to warrant being a named cultivar. It is a nice medium dark pink, where most of the cultivars are selected for white, pale pink, or dark almost red flowers. This one is very much like the majority of the wildlings around. But then, many of the wild ones around here are every bit as dark as the “scarlet” and red cultivars.

I put scarlet in quotes because almost universally, these are really more pink than red. Even the darkest cultivars are more a a very dark saturated fuchsia pink red, than a slightly orange scarlet, if that makes sense. Some people who are sensitive to red don’t like calling these red because of that, and they do look better with more pink friendly colors than the orange side of the spectrum. I have seen a few wild ones turned more scarlet, but in most cases these look dry and kind of sickly, so I am not sure that is something you would want to emulate in your garden.

Whatever the color, these are excellent when in flower for attracting hummingbirds. These are so important for hummers, that more often than not, their flowering starts the season for catching a glimpse of the elusive Rufous in the garden. Most years the first rufous shows up about the same time these and the salmonberry start flowering. Almost like clockwork, around a week after the first flowers open I’ll start seeing a little reddish ball of fluff chasing the more resident Anna’s off their favorite shrub. It’s one of the reasons I have so many of these, lol. Even this year, when the currants started blooming about two weeks ahead of their normal bloom time, I saw the first rufous about five days later.

I think one of the reasons it is so important for this is that the shrub really does cover itself in flowers in full bloom. From overhead, as say for a migrating bird, it must shine like a great pink beacon! It really does draw in the birds amazingly well. The salmonberry may have showy individual flowers, but they don’t really catch your eye so much from across the garden. RFC is a by contrast a bright exclamation point in the garden.

Of course, it only flowers for a short period of time, little more than a month. Luckily the flowers are followed by odd little blue black berries. Though these are edible, they aren’t that great tasting to people. Chickadees and other fruit loving birds, on the other hand, seem to really enjoy them. I do tend to trim off fruits on plants just settling in, but fruit set on older plants can be pretty impressive in a good year. I’m actually surprised we don’t see more seedlings around.

Propagation is pretty easy, either from seed or from cuttings. I’m told seed is best from freshly picked fruits, cleaned and sewn directly, but I don’t have any direct experience with it. Cuttings can be taken near year round. Hard wood cuttings can be shoved directly into the soil where you want them to grow, in late summer and even winter, just be careful to water carefully in summer so the developing plants don’t dry out. The most successful way though is to do softwood cuttings, preferably with a mister of some kind, in a loose growing medium like pumice or pearlite. Most of the commercial propagation is done this way.

So Ribes sanguineum is an excellent wildlife plant, gorgeous ornamental, and all around stellar garden plant. For anyone who can grow it, especially on the west coast, you really should. The hummers will thank you!

Ribes sanguineum

28 Apr

20130428-080301.jpg

Ribes sanguineum, the red flowering currant, is (and I know I say this a lot, lol, but it’s really true!) one of my favorite natives. In this case, it’s not just because of the spectacular show of the bright white to pink to reddish pink flowers, it’s also because when this is in bloom, it is the queen of hummingbird plants. It blooms in early spring, sometimes even late winter, generally in March and April, about the same time as another hummingbird favorite, the salmonberry (Rubus spectabilis). Where salmonberry likes its feet wet, especially in winter, RFC likes it dry. It will take sun or shade, though is happiest somewhere between, and aside from not liking to be too wet is not picky about soils. I’ve seen beautiful ones growing in cracks in bedrock on steep cliffs, and others in the understory of closed canopy conifers. It’s a tough plant, and will take a fair amount of abuse and come back smiling. While I don’t recommend it, it’s one of the few shrubs you can literally plant and walk away, and as long as its not too dry, have a fair chance of getting it to survive. Regular watering the first few years will help immensely though.

As I said, it doesn’t like wet feet. If this plant has one major drawback, its that it seems to have weak roots. It is susceptible to root rot in various forms. Given too wet a spot, it may do well for a few year, but with any damage to the roots will quickly get root rot and more often than not, suddenly collapse. This also means that if its in the wrong spot, it rarely transplants well once established. You are actually better off taking cuttings and propagating the plant to where you want to move it to, than trying to transplant a bigger one. It is also one of the alternate hosts of a rust that also attacks white pines. This rust is rarely fat to the currant, but can quickly become so on the pine. If you have white pines, watch for yellow to orange rusty spots and speck long on the back of the leaves of the currant, and puss like weeping sap from canker like boils on the trunks of the pine. The cankers can kill the pine, but the currant generally simply sheds its leaves in fall, and is ok in spring, though the plant is often stressed enough if other factors affect the plant the combination can be lethal. Raking these leaves in fall is a must if you see them, dispose of them in a plastic bag, don’t burn them or put them in yard waste as the spores of the rust can then infect other plants. Other than that, these are generally easy care shrubs with few problems or diseases most of the time.

Pruning couldn’t be simpler. It responds well to pruning, even making it into a box like shrub hedge if needed. Just remember winter pruning will reduce flowers that year, though it will generally bounce back quickly from even a heavy pruning.

As you might expect, there are a fair number of cultivars of this amazingly ornamental shrub, both from local selections of wild or garden plants, and quite a few developed in Europe. When I first started planting natives, about the only one available in nurseries (and still one of the most common varieties) was “King Edward VII”. A friend and I joke that this is a species that had to “go to Europe to get an education” before people would accept it. Now there are dozens of cultivars, and as a testament to how much I love this plant, I have quite a few here myself.

Along with the straight native, I have ‘Strybing Pink’, ‘Pokey’s Pink’, ‘Appleblossom’, ‘Pulsborough Scarlet’, and ‘variegata’. I used to also have ‘Elk River Red’ which was very similar to Pulsborough Scarlet’, but is a more local selection, I think from Oregon.

I do these days try and stay away from California selections of the more southerly variety Ribes sanguineum glutinosum, simply because I would rather keep the species roots more intact. May be a silly thing, but I think it’s important.

I recently picked up another one, ‘White Icicle’, which I will try in the back. I like this cultivar, not just because the nearly pure white flowers are different than most I have, but because it tends to bloom a week or two earlier than the darker cultivars. This is one I believe was developed in BC, and is a tried and true cultivar, with a nice open slightly wider habit than some of the others.

The picture above is from the one seedling I have had self seed in the garden. Luckily it grew in a spot I can leave it, though its getting big enough I may have to start trimming it back. I refer to it myself as “Ace of Mercer”, but I don’t know if its special enough to warrant being a named cultivar. It is a nice medium dark pink, where most of the cultivars are selected for white, pale pink, or dark almost red flowers. This one is very much like the majority of the wildlings around. But then, many of the wild ones around here are every bit as dark as the “scarlet” and red cultivars.

I put scarlet in quotes because almost universally, these are really more pink than red. Even the darkest cultivars are more a a very dark saturated fuchsia pink red, than a slightly orange scarlet, if that makes sense. Some people who are sensitive to red don’t like calling these red because of that, and they do look better with more pink friendly colors than the orange side of the spectrum. I have seen a few wild ones turned more scarlet, but in most cases these look dry and kind of sickly, so I am not sure that is something you would want to emulate in your garden.

Whatever the color, these are excellent when in flower for attracting hummingbirds. These are so important for hummers, that more often than not, their flowering starts the season for catching a glimpse of the elusive Rufous in the garden. Most years the first rufous shows up about the same time these and the salmonberry start flowering. Almost like clockwork, around a week after the first flowers open I’ll start seeing a little reddish ball of fluff chasing the more resident Anna’s off their favorite shrub. It’s one of the reasons I have so many of these, lol. Even this year, when the currants started blooming about two weeks ahead of their normal bloom time, I saw the first rufous about five days later.

I think one of the reasons it is so important for this is that the shrub really does cover itself in flowers in full bloom. From overhead, as say for a migrating bird, it must shine like a great pink beacon! It really does draw in the birds amazingly well. The salmonberry may have showy individual flowers, but they don’t really catch your eye so much from across the garden. RFC is a by contrast a bright exclamation point in the garden.

Of course, it only flowers for a short period of time, little more than a month. Luckily the flowers are followed by odd little blue black berries. Though these are edible, they aren’t that great tasting to people. Chickadees and other fruit loving birds, on the other hand, seem to really enjoy them. I do tend to trim off fruits on plants just settling in, but fruit set on older plants can be pretty impressive in a good year. I’m actually surprised we don’t see more seedlings around.

Propagation is pretty easy, either from seed or from cuttings. I’m told seed is best from freshly picked fruits, cleaned and sewn directly, but I don’t have any direct experience with it. Cuttings can be taken near year round. Hard wood cuttings can be shoved directly into the soil where you want them to grow, in late summer and even winter, just be careful to water carefully in summer so the developing plants don’t dry out. The most successful way though is to do softwood cuttings, preferably with a mister of some kind, in a loose growing medium like pumice or pearlite. Most of the commercial propagation is done this way.

So Ribes sanguineum is an excellent wildlife plant, gorgeous ornamental, and all around stellar garden plant. For anyone who can grow it, especially on the west coast, you really should. The hummers will thank you!

What’s Blooming- April 22nds, 2013

24 Apr

We’ve gone from a week of cold blustery rainy icky weather, to beautiful sunny days and cold nights… almost more like late winter its so cold, down into the upper 30s a couple of nights, but nie 50-60 degree weather by mid afternoon. I am so ready to start shovelling plants out the door, but the night temps are just too damn cold for that.

Anyway, here is what’s bloooming now;

INSIDE-

Cymbidium

Begonia boliviensis

Salvia coccinea (Forest Fire? maybe Lady in Red….)

Phaelenopsis

Fuchsia x (Display)

Fucshia tryphylla ‘Gartenmeister Bonstedt’

(Christmas cactus)

Kalanchoe

OUTSIDE-

Camelia japonica ‘Kumasaka’

Camelia japonica (pink striped flowered one)

Camelia japonica (neighbors early light pink)

Ribes sanguineum ‘Pokey’s Pink’

Ribes sanguineum ‘Strybing Pink’

Claytonia sibirica

Fuchsia magelania ‘Molinae’

Primula acaulis

Viola labradorica

Lamiastrum galeobdolen

Clematis montana ‘Rubens’

Cardamine hirsuta

Lunaria annua

Vaccinium ovatum

Mahonia aquifolium

Osmanthus delavayi
Narcissus ‘Mt Hood’

Narcissus ‘Grand de Soleil’ (basically done, deadheaded now)

Narcissus (Holland Sensation)

Taraxacum officinale

Cerastium tomentosum

Muscari armeniacum

Camassia leichtlinii

Tulipa (yellow and two purple ones)

(Salvia coccinea ‘Snow Nymph’ still in six packs, recently purchased)

Lamium purpureum

Spriaea vanhoutei (basically done)

Hyacinthus hispanicus

Barbarea orthocerus

Vinca minor variegata

Tellima grandiflora

Arctostaphylos columbiana

Grevilla victoriae

Trillium ovatum

Trillium albiflorum

Mahonia nervosa

Geranium phaeum

Ribes sanguineum ‘Appleblossom’

Rhody (fragrant pink)

Rhody (“wild” type)

Rubus spectabilis

Fuchsia Whiteknight’s Amythest’

Chaenomeles x

Corydalis scouleri

Corydalis (flexuosa/)

Oxalis oregana

Prunus avium

Hyacinthus hispanicus alba

Sambucus raemosa

Acer macrophyllum

Acer circinatum

Helleborus orientalis/niger (done, most cut back except for a few with seed pods)

Carex inops

Myrhhus odoratus

Rubus ursinus

Iris japonica ‘Ledger’s Variety

Symphitum ‘Bressingham Blue’

Draba verna

Allysum (common annual left from last year)

Not bad for mid spring, if I do say so myself 😀