Archive | August, 2013

Impatiens capensis, I. noli-tangere

28 Aug

Aside from the typical annual Impatiens, my first ‘wild’ impatiens was one I picked up at Mercer Slough. I loved the tall annual with the dusky pink flowers that hummers would visit a bit till the bumbles got into them, and I adored how the bumbles would crawl all he way inside the odd flowers, then buzz their way backwards to get out, lol. Unfortunately, it was t long after I had them well established that I found out that particular species, I. glamdulifera, is an official no joins weed. It certainly seeds itself well enough to be one, for sure.

A few years after that, a good friend of mine gave me seedlings of one she got at the MSK Rare Plant nursery in Shoreline. Although this species, Impatiens noli-tangere is native to the northwestern counties of Washington up into British Columbia and east, the seed for this strain originated in the Northeast US. It’s bright yellow hooded flowers are smaller than the above policeman’s helmet, but similar, and with a nice long spur. Till this year, I had never seen. Hummer visit, only the abundant bees, bit a week or so ago I watched a female Anna’s visit nearly every flower open on a handful that survived the summer drought in the back.

Now it may be that my most recent acquisition, Impatiens capensis, has given he birds a heads up? Hard to say, but the orange speckled flowers of this species are otherwise very similar in shape to the noli-tangere I already had. I got six small seedlings from Patrick on the hummingbird forum, and though they were planted rather late, and there hasn’t been a lot of top growth, there are quite a few flowers on several of them.

I’m still hoping to find one of the native species, Impatiens ecalcarata in particular, but they seem to be rather overrun with I. capensis these days. It probably should be a noxious weed, really, but at least it is really popular with the bees and hummingbirds. I imagine something eats those big succulent seeds, too.

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What’s Blooming August 28th, 2013

28 Aug

Abutilon x megapotamicum

Achillea millefolium (yarrow)

Agastache x ‘Apricot Sprite’

Agastache x ‘Grape Nectar’

Agastache x ‘Orange Nectar’

Anaphales margaretaceae (pearly everlasting)

Antirrhinum majus ‘Rocket’ (snapdragon)

Aster curtus

Aster modestus

Aster subspicatus

Bacopa monieri

Ballotta nigra

Begonia boliviensis ‘Bonfire’

Buddleia davidii ‘Dark Knight’

Calliandra eriophylla

Celosia x ‘New Look’

Chaenorrhinum origanifolium ‘Blue Dream’

Chamerion angustifolium

Chrysanthemum partheniacum

Claytonia sibirica

Convulvulus arvensis

Corydalis lutea

Cuphea x cyanea ‘Carribean Sunset’

Cuphea ignea (short form)

Cuphea ignea (tall form)

Cuphea llavea ‘Flamenco Samba’

Cuphea llavea ‘Tiny Mice’

Cyclamen hederifolium

Dahlia (Bishop’s type, red fl with red lvs)

Dahlia (white cactus flowered)

Dicentra formosa

Echinacea purpurea

Epilobium ciliatum (willow herb)

Fuchsia campos-portoi

Fuchsia magellanica ‘aurea’

Fuchsia magellanica ‘molinae’

Fuchsia magellanica (gram’s)

Fuchsia magellanica (Patrick’s)

Fuchsia magellanica (plant swap)

Fuchsia triphylla ‘Gartenmeister Bonstedt’

Fuchsia triphylla ‘Mary’

Fuchsia x ‘Auntie Jinks’

Fuchsia x ‘Billy Green’

Fuchsia x ‘Display’

Fuchsia x ‘Lachlade Magician’

Fuchsia x ‘Marinka’

Fuchsia x ‘Princessita’

Fuchsia x ‘Whiteknight’s Amethyst’

Impatiens capensis

Impatiens noli-tangere

Ipomoea multifida

Justicia brandegeana

Lactuca muralis

Lactuca sativa

Lantana camara ‘Landmark Peach Sunrise’

Lapsana communis (nipplewort)

Liatris spicata (gayfeather)

Lobelia erinus (annual lobelia)

Lobularia maritime (annual allysum)

Lonicera japonica ‘Pink Lemonade’

Lonicera sempervirens ‘Major Wheeler’

Lonicera ‘sulphurea’

Malva moschata

Mellissa citriodora (lemonbalm)

Mentha himalayensis

Mentha piperita ‘Chocolate’

Mentha spicata ‘Moroccan Mint’

Nemesia x ‘Armomatica White Improved’

Nicotiana alata grandiflora

Nicotiana mutabilis

Nicotiana x ‘Knightiana’

Ocimum basilicum (sweet basil)

Oenothera missouriensis

Pelargonium x ‘Tango Velvet Red’ (old fashioned geranium)

Pentas lanceolata

Phaelenopsis hybrids (3)

Polygonum sp

Rosa chinensis ‘mutabilis’

Saintpaulia hybrids (4) (African violets)

Salvia coccinea ‘Forest Fire’

Salvia coccinea ‘Snow Nymph’

Salvia darcyi ‘Pscarl’

Salvia elegans ‘Tangerine’

Salvia guaranitica ‘Black and Blue’

Salvia leucantha x ‘Phyllis Fancy’

Salvia microphylla ‘Cerro Potosi’

Salvia microphylla ‘Hotlips’

Salvia patens ‘Cobalt’

Salvia x ‘Wendy’s Wish’

Schizanthes pinnatus

Sedum spectabile ‘Autumn Joy’

Sedum spectabile (Heronswood variegated)

Solidago Canadensis (goldenrod)

Stachys cooleyae

Strobilanthes dyeriana

Tagetes x ‘Disco Orange’

Tagetes x ‘Disco Yellow’Verbena x ‘Estella Vodoo’

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

What’s Blooming August 20th, 2013

22 Aug

Achillea millefolium

Abutilon (megapotamicum)

Agapanthus hybrid

Agastache foeniculum ‘Golden Jubilee’

Agastache x ‘Apricot Sprite’

Agastache x ‘Grape Nectar’

Agastache x ‘Orange Nectar’

Aster modestus

Anaphalis margaritaceae

Antirrhinum majus ‘Rocket’

Bacopa monieri

Ballotta nigra

Begonia boliviensis ‘Bonfire’

Buddleia davidii ‘Dark Knight’

Calliandra eriophylla

Campanula carpatica

Cardamine hirsuta

Celosia x ‘New Look’

Chaenorrhinum origanifolium ‘Blue Dream’

Chamerion angustifolium

Chlorophyton comosum

Chrysanthemum partheniacum

Chrysanthemum x superbum

Claytonia sibirica

Convulvulus arvensis

Coreopsis auriculata ‘nana’

Corydalis lutea

Crocosmia masonorum

Cuphea cyanea ‘Carribean Sunset’

Cuphea ignea (short form)

Cuphea ignea (tall form)

Cuphea llavea ‘Flamenco Samba’

Cuphea llavea ‘Tiny Mice’

Cyclamen hederophylla

Cymbidium hybrid

Dahlia (Bishop type)

Dahlia (white cactus flowered)

Dicentra formosa

Echinacea purpurea

Epilobium ciliatum

Foeniculum vulgare ‘purpurea’

Fuchsia campos-portoi

Fuchsia magellanica ‘aurea’

Fuchsia magellanica ‘Lachlade Magician’

Fuchsia magellanica ‘molinae’

Fuchsia magellanica ‘Whiteknight’s Amethyst’

Fuchsia magellanica (Gram’s variety)

Fuchsia magellanica (red leaved form)

Fuchsia magellanica (Patrick’s)

Fuchsia magellanica (plant swap)

Fuchsia triphylla ‘Billy Jean’

Fuchsia triphylla ‘Gartenmeister Bonstedt’

Fuchsia triphylla ‘Mary’

Fuchsia x ‘Auntie Jinks’

Fuchsia x ‘Display’

Fuchsia x ‘Juellia’

Fuchsia x ‘Marinka’

Fuchsia x ‘Princessita’

Gazania x ‘Daybreak Garden Sun’

Hibiscus syriacus ‘Red Heart’

Impatiens capensis

Impatiens noli-tangere

Ipomoea luteola

Ipomoea multifida

Kalanchoe blossfieldiana

Lactuca muralis

Lactuca sativa

Lantana camara ‘Landmark Peach Sunrise’

Lapsana communis

Lavendula angustifolia

Lespedeza thunbergii

Liatris spicata

Lobelia erinus

Lobularia maritima

Lonicera japonica ‘Pink Lemonade’

Lonicera sempervirens ‘Major Wheeler’

Lonicera x ‘sulphurea’

Lychnis coronaria

Malva moschata

Medicago sativa

Mellissa citriodora

Mentha himalayensis

Mentha piperita ‘Chocolate’

Mentha spicata ‘Moroccan Mint’

Mimulus cardinalis

Mina lobata

Mirabilis jalapa ‘Limelight’

Monarda dydima ‘Gardenview Scarlet’

Nemesia ‘Aromatica White Improved’

Nicotiana alata grandiflora

Nicotiana mutabilis

Nicotiana x ‘Knightiana’

Ocimum basilicum

Oenothera missouriensis

Osteospermum ecklonis?

Oxalis nelsoniana

Pelargonium x ‘Tango Velvet Red’

Pentas lanceolata

Phaseolus coccineus

Polygonum sp

Rosa chinensis ‘mutabilis’

Rubus armeniacus

Salvia coccinea ‘Forest Fire’

Salvia coccinea ‘Snow Nymph’

Salvia darcyi ‘Pscarl’

Salvia elegans ‘Tangerine’

Salvia guaranitica ‘Black and Blue’

Salvia leucantha ‘Phyllis Fancy’

Salvia microphylla ‘Cerro Potosi’

Salvia microphylla ‘Hotlips’

Salvia patens ‘Cobalt’

Salvia x ‘Wendy’s Wish’

Scabiosa alpine ‘Ritz Blue’

Sedum spectabile ‘Autumn Joy’

Senecio cineraria

Sericocarpus rigidus (Aster curtus)

Schizanthus pinnatus

Solenostemon scuttellarioides ‘Kiwi Fern’

Solidago canadensis

Stachys cooleyae

Strobilanthes dyerianus

Symphyotrichum subspicatum

Tagetes signata

Tagetes x ‘Disco Orange’

Tagetes x ‘Disco Yellow’

Tagetes x ‘Starfire Mix’

Tradescantia zebrina

Urtica dioica

Verbena ‘Estrella Vodoo’

Zinnia elegans ‘Swizzle Scarlet and Yellow’

 

Anna’s Perbulations, August 16th, 2013

16 Aug

Around 1:10 in the afternoon

Salvia ‘Wendy’s Wish’

Cuphea ignea (tall form)

Salvia patens ‘Cobalt’

Ipomoea multifida

Nicotiana mutabilis

Mina lobata

Although she went to the Salvia first (that I saw at least), she clearly preferred the Cupjea, going back to it several times before moving on to the vines.

Anna’s Perambulations, August 10, 2013

15 Aug

Ipomoea multifida
Salvia coccinea ‘Snow Nymph’
Agastache ‘Orange Nectar’
Mina lobata

Peanut Butter Humus

15 Aug

I love humus, and I don’t mind making it if I have a food processor handy. The only thing is, tahini is expensive and hard to find… But since tahini is basically sesame seed butter, I thought, why not substitute peanut butter? It isn’t exactly the same, but it does in fact work just fine. Some people like this variation, others think I’m nuts. I like peanut butter, and I like this version of humus… So I think I’ll keep making it 🙂

Ok, I got the basic recipe here- , and I must agree, the order of adding the ingredients really does help, and more to the point, let things blend and smooth out before adding anything else.

So to start, these are the ingredients you need;

1/4 cup lemon juice
1/4 cup peanut butter
1 clove garlic
1 teaspoon ground cumin
1/4 teaspoon salt
2 tablespoons olive oil
1 15oz can garbanzo beans, drained and rinsed

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Start by adding the peanut butter and lemon juice into the food processor with a steel blade, and let it run till the peanut butter lightens in color, almost getting whipped with the lemon juice.

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Whip it good…

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Keep blending till its nice and smooth. If you use a chunky peanut butter, or fresh nuts (I’ve subbed in sunflowers and it turned out nice that way too), you’ll need to blend a little longer.

Peel and add your garlic clove and spices, then a little oil if its getting thick, and a little salt. Keep blending till smooth again. Cutting up or mincing the garlic will speed this up, but your putting it into a food processor right? So blend away.

Now the garbanzos, aka chick peas. Drain the can and rinse the beans-

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Now add them in a handful at a time. To slow with this, don’t rush it! You want it all to be smooth when your done, so let them blend till smoothies before adding a ton more. You might even want to stop and with a spatula scrape down the sides at this point.

Scoop into a bowl, and serve with the usual humus dippers- celery sticks, chips, pita bread, whatever suits your fancy. I like jicama with this, wish I had some now. Tortilla or potato chips work great. This can even work as a filling in a sandwich if you like, with lettuce and a pickle.

Because of the raw garlic I put in this one, it’ll probably be better after things have a chance to meld a d mellow out a bit, but I kinda like it raw like this too, where the lemon and garlic are still kind of separate flavors in the mix. But that’s a personal preference, of course. Eat it how you like it!

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Anna’s Perambulations August 14th, 2013

14 Aug

Around 3:30 pm

Fuchsia magellanica (Gram’s variety)
Salvia elegans ‘Tangerine’
Fuchsia campos-portoi
Cuphea ignea
Salvia microphylla ‘Hotlips’