Mimulus guttatus

22 Jun

Monkey flowers in general have long been one of my favorite groups of plants, native or not. Yellow monkey flowers are probably the most common of our native species, and are definitely the easiest to grow. In the wild, you usually see them on the edges of streams and ponds, happily blooming at the water’s edge. In the garden, they do just fine in regularly irrigated garden beds, pots, and even hanging baskets. Sometimes annual, sometimes perennial, often it’s difficult to tell if your looking at the same plant from year to year, or seedlings. Either way, they can put on quite a show.

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Propagation is either from seed (easy any time of year, just keep the soil moist but not too wet), or divisions of the offsets a d sometime runners. Again, keep the soil moist but not too wet and these are pretty easy to propagate.

Some forms of these can get quite tall, I’ve seen them in Eastern Washington on a stream side get to three, almost four feet, but usually they stay under two feet. Any moist soil will do, just need some sun to flower well. They will often grow but not flower in shade.

Other species do well for hummingbirds, but I haven’t seem my Anna’s show any interest in these common yellow ones. Bumbles on the other hand like to loose themselves in the blooms, with just their but sticking out, lol.

For some these can spread aggressively e ouch to be a garden thug. For me the seed occasionally, but not aggressively, and I love their cheerful flowers. Now if I can just get the pink Mimulus lewisite going…

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